Robert (gurdonark) wrote,
Robert
gurdonark

beatrice's song

I had a quiet day today, recovering from a busy meeting and travel schedule on Friday and Saturday morning. I finished Edwin O'Connor's "The Edge of Sadness", a masterful novel nearly forgotten now, although it won the Pulitzer Prize in 1961. The protagonist, a priest of 50, seemed someone quite easy to relate to and learn from, if one "learns" from fictional characters. I found an irony in the fact that O'Connor himself died at age 49, just shy of his protagonist's age.

In the late afternoon, my wife and I went to the 380 Greenbelt Trail, on Lake Ray Roberts.






We had a great walk, listening to cicada and birdsong, and talking about friends and family and events of the week. I took some field recordings of the birdsong.

We drove down 380 to the Prairie House. I'd heard of this restaurant, but we had not tried it before tonight. I had a great grilled trout, while my wife had barbecue brisket and fresh blackberry cobbler.

We came home, where a light rain fell, much welcomed. We are in something called "phase III" water restrictions, which means roughly to water once a week and be kind to droplets, but we are on the verge of "phrase IV", which, near as I can tell, closes swimming pools and requires one to plant cactus gardens. My cactus are thriving on our back patio, and our sunflowers continue to grow apace.

I took my field recordings of rain and bird, and remixed them with a gorgeous vocal by an Italian living in the UK from ccmixter, adding an ambient piece of mine, an electronic "cfe" effect, and a snazzy repeated percussive theme to create a new remix called Beatrice. The original title of the vocal track was "Ophelia's Song". But who could resist Dante's Beatrice, which is also the name of my dog. My dog's name actually derives from a story in the life of the English poet and writer Charles Williams, who became obsessed with his "Beatrice", a somewhat hapless assistant at the publishing firm at which he worked. My Beatrice is much hipper than all that:


Perhaps I will name my next song Teddy:






The sunflowers continue to bloom in our back yard:


as do the purple coneflowers:




I am glad to have had a quiet Saturday.
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