Robert (gurdonark) wrote,
Robert
gurdonark

getting the word out



I'm sitting at my computer, in the waning moments before I take my shower and go to work, listening to Amoeba Goo Radio. A fellow is singing "down comes the rain", which it isn't actually, though last night it did and was in fact glorious.

Yesterday morning I posted information about my new album at two local resources. First, I had set up a second internet site to make it available for free download, over at soundclick. It is my perception that the Internet Archive and Soundclick.com have different listening constituencies, and thus that a post each place would be good.

I went yesterday early morning to the local community bulletin board web site and to the the local weekly alternative paper to put up postings about how my new album is free for downloading. One fellow wrote a reply that he downloaded "Maroon Bridge", and found it surprisingly good. To me, it's one of the less accessible songs on the release (and hence perhaps one of my favorites).

This morning I checked my soundclick site to see how my promotional efforts had impacted the number of listens and downloads on the site. The number had tripled, and I found that "Maroon Bridge" is now number 8 on the
Soundclick.com Noise sub-chart. The Noise sub-chart is less competitive than the other sub-charts, making a top 20 showing easier to attain, but I am nonetheless very pleased. I will step up my promotional efforts.
My Archive.org site meanwhile has 35 downloads, with a modest but steady growth each day. I'll need to set up a netlabel someday, or develop a relationship with one, because I can see the advantage of branding in this context.

I've taken a lot of inspiration from cpmcdill, who has grown his netlabel, "Webbed Hand Records", from obscurity to being an internet presence in just a very limited period of time. Their releases get downloaded in the thousands. He was quite helpful to me when I asked a question about all this some short while ago.
I aspire to finding enough audience to have hundreds or even thousands of downloads some day. I simply do not do work as interesting as some of the Webbed Hand material, but I do find that some people "get" my home-made
down-to-earth free music ethic. I'm always a bit skeptical of other alternatives. I was reading the website of the anarchist pop band Chumbawumba recently. I was struck by how easy it is for even mildly stark dissent to come off sounding just the slightest bit like a position rather than a life. I still love the female backing vocal in "tubthumping", the best anarchist one-hit wonder song on earth--her voice just sends me. I don't see my goals as being about making "real" music", but about changing ways of looking at and participating in music. In this, I don't have new ideas, but do have a desire to market the old ones more effectively than others have done before me. We'll see if my grandiose visions come to any reality.

My Absurd Music Exchange has 14 members now, but this is far less than the center of gravity I will need to
really advance my idea. I had hoped that the music listeners would include potential devotees, but I find instead that seeking out musicians through one on one exchange is my best recruiting device. I'll remix a song of theirs and send it to them--sometimes I get a favorable response, less often a "thanks, but that's really glitchy" response. Glitch is a compliment in some circles, an insult in others, but for me, it's just one more part of home recording.

So I'm pleased with where I am, but wanting to go more places. I think next I'll aim at netradio, and further marketing of the materials.
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