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October 15th, 2019

glassed in and traded in

Monday I got up very early. I kept my 7 a.m. appointment at Safelite. My Chevrolet windshield got hit by a rock last week. My insurer scheduled me to get it fixed at Safelite.

The technician came out promptly and advised that my windshield needed replacement. This proved no surprise, but he surprised me by saying that I needed a new appointment to accomplish that. I set up a new appointment for 2:30 pm. that day. At 2:30, I waited in a waiting room while a John Wayne western played. This John Wayne western, about bad guys trying to steal gold, featured a second banana comic relief role based on demeaning racial stereotypes.  I recalled that later in life Mr. Wayne also said absurd racist things. I looked up information on the African-American actor who played the sidekick. I got his name from the credits--Blue Washington. I found on the internet that he made dozens of films, but usually in very small roles.

The glass replacement went swiftly. I headed back to my office. At day's end, I drove my car to Enterprise Car Sales. I let them inspect the car for a trade-in value. I spoke with the nice man, Motaz, who sold us the Hyundai I bought. Soon the dealership manager brought me an offer. The offer fell in the lower range of the offers I saw as possible. As with any such offer, I probably could have held onto the car, sold it to a private party, and done a bit better. But I held on to my Hyundai Sonata without selling it for far too long some years ago. I determined not to commit that error again. I did run the car through an instant offer service at kbb.com. The offer price came out a bit higher, but I discounted that price because I felt my answers to the questions about the car insufficiently painted its disadvantages. A man from a local dealership called expressing interest in the car after I ran the kbb.com system. I decided, though, not to start again, but to get the car "off the books."   I remain curious, though, if another buyer, after a proper in-person inspection, offered the potential to offer a dollar more.

We re-did the purchase paperwork so that I got the trade-in credit (and my sales tax due dropped a bit). I wrote a new check, tore up the old check, and  bid farewell to the Equinox. I drove the Equinox for three weeks short of eight years. That longevity of ownership fails to impress nowadays, when folks get 10 or 14 years from a car. But I still felt good about the Equinox.

My wife celebrated the bank holiday which gave her a day off work. She went for a swim at the natatorium. I phoned her to come sign off the title and to drive me home. We got that last paperwork complete. We headed off to home. The dealership called. I accidentally left my garage door clicker behind. I asked my wife to drive us on home. I then took my car to the dealership. A nice Autumn rain fell. I listened to sports on the radio.

We watched the television programs "All Rise" and "Bluff City Law". Beatrice and I shared some bananas. My wife prepared a delightful turkey chili with beans.


The experience of buying and selling cars on a "no haggle" basis felt almost new to me (though my Sonata purchase around 2005 involved basically no haggle, but only a dealer beating a competitor's advertised price). My work taught me the art of negotiation and haggling, so it is familiar ground for me. A "no haggling" purchase or sale probably afford me the loss of an advantage in getting the best price. My ability to negotiate proved to save us money when we bought my wife's Nissan Altima many years ago. But I admit that the "no hassle" factor and time savings of this "no haggling" approach, combined with the speed and ease of the transactions, increased my satisfaction with my purchase.

from Dreamwidth, because two posts of the same text are twice as nice

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