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December 18th, 2010

driving north short of Shasta

This morning I got up early to pick up the young friend I mentor through the Big Brothers program. First I loaded some new Creative Commons mp3s onto his mp3 player. Then at 8:05 a.m., I picked him up. We drove up Highway 5, stopping at the drive-through donut shop in the country along the way. We crossed the Red River just north of Bonham, and then drove through rather rural areas through towns with names like Achille, past short horn cows and furrowed donkeys and bare, wintry fields filled with meadowlarks and the corpses of a young coyote and of raccoons erased from this mortal coil by encounters with traffic.

We finally pulled in at one lake park, to find a lack of an adequate hiking trail. We looked at a really regal
great blue heron, and walked along the lakeshore. Then we went to another lake park where we hiked in a wooded trail with lots of fallen leaves. On the lake we saw a cormorant. In the woods we saw robins.

We ate at a Cafe Roma in Durant, OK, where the service was very good and my ravioli would have made Chef Boy surrender the remaining letters of his name. We did not have the time to hit the two charming used bookstores in the little downtime, but I made a mental note to stop next time I am up that way. I also saw a wonderful used cruiser bike outside the Goodwill, but did not buy it.

We stopped at a Best Buy, as my friend wanted a CD. The line was long. My patience was, fortunately, not short.

Entertainment for the Braindead wrote me a nice reply to my recent words of encouragment. A friend put a nice comment up to my vimeo video "let us be kind". My wife purchased an e-reader as part of her holiday, and we enjoyed watching her work its features. My wife heard an owl outside, but I could not hear it due to talkative neighbors. Two shasta daisy flowers remain in bloom in our backyard. Lake Lavon shows the first signs of impending la nina drought--a dry bit of lakebed. The moon is nearly full--Monday night it will eclipse.
Tomorrow afternoon warmer weather is predicted.

My family has a great tradition of keeping up with its history. We have a lot of oral tradition, like
the return of my forebears from the Civil War. A great-great-grandfather left an autobiographical essay--it appears he could have done better with his various business ventures, if only he had not done worse.
My father has now provided a private printing of his own life's story. I love the way he put a lot of pictures I had not seen in the book. It's good to preserve things within family.

I'm not sure which way the wind blows, but that doesn't make me a folk singer.