?

Log in

No account? Create an account

July 27th, 2009

beyond all that

The rain fell today, applying a welcome balm on a world besotted with depression and dysfunction. I woke with a kind of inward sigh of relief this morning from a long sleep, a stiltskin sleep, an eight-hours-at-a-time sleep. I banished the ghost of ghosts past--the remembrance of things that did not happen as ideally as they could have happened in the past. I drove to work as if the past were over, and only the future lies ahead.

Splash of color

I've been thinking about how the world is full of small victories to win. Perhaps the accretion of enough small victories amounts to a larger success--perhaps small victories are their own reward. All I know is that I will choose my fields of contest-and try to occupy the higher ground.

I finished a short story in Asimov's science fiction magazine during lunch [turkey, lettuce, wheat bread, sauerkraut, salt, pepper, baked chips, diet Coke, all from a Whichwhich sandwich emporium]. In the story, a man and a robot struck up a friendship. The story was about what it means to be human, and what it means to care, and what being human and caring can do to make life livable. I really enjoyed the story--it reminded me of checking out books in the Arkadelphia, Arkansas Public Library when I was 13, and reading stories about the meaning of life and the meaning of rocketry.

I thought tonight how glib choices lead to disastrous results--and how there is no longer enough time in the day to make such glib choices--when we live in a time with so much to actually do. A television program showed Will Rogers' jibe at Calvin Coolidge, who presided over the last dose of false prosperity before a crash--"He did nothing--which is exactly what we wanted him to do!". People see terms like "straight and narrow" as a cliche', but so often the things I have known people to accomplish got done because they flew the beeline to the goal.

The City of Dallas determined to cut its public library budget by one third. I believe that budgets should balance, and that economic hard times require difficult measures. I also believe that when times are down the public library should be a force and a solace, and not a victim. Too much to do--and not time enough to dwell on one's own past and pains.