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June 13th, 2007

velveteen



I like escapist fiction, whether it be PG Wodehouse, Miss Read or Dorothy Sayers' novels.
It's like a photograph of a rabbit. Put it in the photo editor, extrude the colors, fade the borders, add fx like oil paint and watercolors. Soon life looks as if it looks the way that life should be lived. You can't quite hutch this particular form of rabbit, but the warmest regard sometimes arises from a visit to its meadow.

I daydreamed today about a thing I consider inevitable--the rise of a Creative Commons sharing culture, in which everyone who wishes creates, everyone who wishes consumea, and the fun, rather than the money, is the thing. From each, according to her whimsy. To each, according to her whimsy. This kind of sharing culture is my particular velveteen rabbit, and I'd like to see it live and breathe and become just as real as if were made of flesh and blood. Small hops, for now. But giant leaps, maybe someday.

Jailhouse Stray

Tonight I had a flat tire on the freeway, but I pulled over without incident. As I arduously changed my tire, a nice man and his nice wife stopped to help. He pitched in, got the tire changed in half the time I would have taken, and, with a small honorarium for his niece, disappeared into the not-always-mean streets.

This morning I was driving to work, thinking about the right vocal sample for a song I created, when I said "why not sing?". Long-time readers of this journal will know that I love to sing, but that singing does not always love me back.

Yet the cause was a good one. I decided this morning to sing a modest song about animal rescue.

I've put it in one of those box.net widgets, so that if you'd like to hear it you can download it or you can just click on it and the widget will play it in a cool little flash player. It features percussion samples by the amazing Dutch artist Marco Raaphorst and ccmixter Indjnuz. I created the entire piece, except for the vocal track, in a 25 dollar stand-alone software synthesizer called Sawcutter 2.0.