Robert (gurdonark) wrote,
Robert
gurdonark

Not literature but experience

 I woke up early, ate breakfast, fell back asleep and woke up late.  I still got to work in reasonably good order, even though some of my commute time involved watching traffic be held up while a plumber's truck cleared from a lane. Fortunately,  I stuck to the access road.

Today featured the kind of warm weather that makes me glad to live where I live. I had a nice chat with our firm's accountant, whose daughters are both university-age. She and I both grew up in small towns in the south. I think my town was smaller,  and is now just as small, while the town in which she grew up got much larger. I think sometimes about the way upbringing and aspirations tie together. This happens in both an ideal way and a less ideal way. I think both of us were raised to attend university but also to have a pragmatic, job-oriented approach to it. On the other hand, our accountant's approach was much more pragmatic than mine--she got an accounting/finance degree, while I got a bachelor of arts in physics with a "special emphasis area" in English literature. Had I been more pragmatic, I suppose I would have studied engineering. On the other hand, law school proved pragmatic enough.  Our accountant's daughters are experiencing a semester (or two) of study abroad. Their mother could not have been able to do that at their age. Perhaps the American Dream is less giving kids the things one never and more giving them interesting experiences. Though in this case, the experience costs something, I think it is not the cost but the quality of the experience that matters.

After work, I walked Beatrice. She loved it.  I like the way she gets so excited when she realizes I am getting ready to take her. I like the way she dawdles during the walk.

On the radio this morning, the public radio station in Commerce talked about the stadium for its local university, Texas A & M Commerce. This university named its 1950 stadium Memorial Stadium in honor of the 68 students and alumni who died in the service in World War Two. That is a huge figure for what was then a small university, and remains not a big university.  I read a history of the university from its founding in the 1880s as a "normal" (teacher training) college through 1920 when it became a full-fledged college-degree-granting university.

I have a special place in my heart for Texas A & M Commerce. In 1981, when it was still called East Texas State University, I stopped in at Commerce during a Texas trek in which I sought to figure out a few things about myself. .

I had my law school admission, but I was thinking about graduate school in English. I thought I'd become a technical writer.
They treated me there with great kindness, and offered me an assistant-ship which would have paid for my further schooling. I went to law school instead, but I have never forgotten the kindness of the English faculty that Summer when I needed a little kindness and confidence. In the event, I knew after one week of law school  that it was my vocation, so I never got that graduate degree in English.

I read the commencement program for the 1907 graduating class.  Among other speakers, Ms. Avis Earnheart gave a talk on "Evangeline and Rebecca".  My late maternal grandmother was a normal school graduate in Arkansas, who later went back to university to get a bachelor's degree after teaching certification moved beyond the old normal degree/certificate system.

On television tonight I saw the movie "Portrait of Jennie". I'm very fond of this movie. It was a flop at the box office, but I think Joseph Cotton and Jennifer Jones get it just right in this small supernatural film.

breakfast: cereal and skim milk
lunch: roast beef sandwich and baked chips
dinner: fried chicken breasts, green beans and a roll






(lovingly copied by hand from Dreamwidth by the LiveJournal cyber-angels)
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